EP

All posts tagged EP

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

Godflesh

Artist: Godflesh

Album: Decline and Fall

Release Date: 6/2/14

Rating: 9/10

Many of the down-tuned, guttural vocal bands that dominated the scene of the late 90’s, owe their entire career, and then some, to Godflesh. The pioneering industrial metal act, led by mastermind guitarist and vocalist, Justin Broadrick, burst onto the scene in around 1990, just as the industrial sound as it came to be was reaching it’s creative peak. Whereas acts like Ministry and KMFDM where fusing sampled drum loops with thrash metal guitar riffs, Godflesh choose a similar path, only using slowed down, low-tuned doom and sludge metal style riffs.

Their innovative style, an entire song or a good portion of a song revolving around a repeating heavy riffs and mechanical grove, proved to be a huge influence on nu metal acts like KoRn and Coal Chamber several years later. With successful albums such as Streetcleaner, Pure, and Songs of Love and Hate, Godflesh also helped push future industrial acts like Fear Factory and Static-X in a more metal-dominated direction.

After retiring Godflesh for nearly a decade and striking out with the more indie/shoegaze project Jesu, Broadrick resurrected the band four years ago and now returns with a new EP.

Decline and Fall is the Godflesh fans have been yearning for. It represents a refreshed, mature and even more angry unit, with the energy and passion of a new act on their debut release. The EP kicks off with the single “Ringer,” a slamming industrial-sludge grinder that boldly sets the tone. From there, the ferocious “Dogbite” and the droningly melodic “Playing with Fire” return Godflesh to their heyday, but with an even darker and heavier take. Finally, the closing track, “Decline and Fall,” shows Broadrick and bassist G.C. Green hitting a creative high.

The best thing about Decline and Fall is that it sounds like an industrial metal from the genre’s heyday without feeling dated. Perhaps Godflesh was always a few steps ahead of their time, and only to be imitated, and in some cases ripped off, by acts who would achieve far more mainstream success. Still, if anything, Decline and Fall boldly proves that Godflesh are, and always have been innovators and originators.

The only flaw is that the EP ends abruptly. It rises, nearly climaxes, but drops. However, despite the tease of an EP, a full-length is scheduled for the Fall of this year. In the meantime, fans from back in the day, as well as fans of industrial and the growing sludge and doom scenes will appreciate Decline and Fall, as it is truly a return to their gloomy glory!

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

ghostep600

Artist: Ghost B.C.

Album: If You Have Ghost (EP)

Release Date: 11/19/13

Rating: 4/5

Swedish doom-metallers Ghost B.C. first hit the international scene just a few short years ago. With over-the-top theatrics and horrifying Satanic imagery including mock bishop costumes, the back gave modern shock rock a well-needed kick in the balls. They have single-handedly slayed audiences across the globe, included a top 100 debut in the U.S. with their last album, Infestissumam, and have proven to scare the shit out of parents who have grew up on the likes of Marilyn Manson and Insane Clown Posse. And for their next trick, they cover the likes of pop music icons ABBA!

Yes, on their recently released covers EP, If You Have Ghost, produced by none other than Dave Grohl, the Satanic shock rockers choose to remake some very unlikely numbers from a range of diverse artists. Forget the obvious Slayer or typical dark and brutal heavy metal band. The aforementioned ABBA, along with Depeche Mode, and garage rock pioneer Roky Erickson are just a few of the brilliantly peculiar artists Ghost B.C. have chosen to convert to the dark side.

If You Have Ghost continentally begins with an upbeat rendition of Erickson’s “If You Have Ghost.” The band’s trademark dual lead guitar and soaring vocals are present, yet not much else is very doom-metal about this track. However, it hits on the mark and serves as a very pleasant listen. Next, a cover of ABBA’s “The Marionette.” What do “Dancing Queens” and inverted crucifixes have in common? Not much. But the quirky choice doesn’t necessarily fall completely flat; the falsetto vocals rival the original.

The EP begins to gain some serious steam by the third track, a version of Army of Lovers’ “Crucified.” A touch of darkness is brought to the reimagining of this pop hit, and their natural theatricality proves fitting for the track. Finally, their take on Depeche Mode’s “Waiting For the Night” serves ultimately climatic, taking the somber track to new sonic heights without leaving it’s original vibe in the dust, successfully bridging any gap between DM and doom metal.

Closing the EP is a live cut of a highlight track off Infestissumam, “Secular Haze.” For those who haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing the band live, this little cut hints at what one can expect.

All in all, If You Have Ghost is a well-produced (kudos Mr. Grohl) and interesting listen. Not all will get it, but for those who will, it’s pretty cool. Perhaps a larger collection of covers, leaning closer to a full album’s worth, might help these tracks not feel so sparse. Still, their take on all of the songs is worth a listen. The EP is definitely not the right record to introduce one to the band. Perhaps Infestissumam, or their equally entertaining debut, Opus Eponymus, should be required listens before checking out If You Have Ghost.