Hardcore Punk

All posts tagged Hardcore Punk

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

Artist: Nervous Aggression

Album: This is Ragecore

Rating: 9/10

A great amount of noise has been made down in East Liverpool, Ohio. A group of punks have been studying their surroundings. And through the power of their ferocious, gut-punching music, they have turned their rage outward, aiming at a society on the verge of collapse.

Nervous Aggression are such punks up for the challenge. With their latest release, This is Ragecore, they carrying the old school Hardcore ethos as a badge of honor, while raising a voice for a new generation of disenchanted punks ready and willing to take a stand!

Clocking in at around only 10 minutes, This is Ragecore is a straight kick-in-the-teeth through six tracks. From beginning to end, the EP is an unrelenting blast of rage and, oddly enough, hope. Kicking off with a blast of Hardcore Punk found on opener “Attack” and leading into “Your Band Sucks,” Nervous Aggression quickly establish a raging declaration of independence from a scene that seldom has the balls to engage current events with such unflinching intensity.

From there, the protest anthem “No Justice No Peace” directly reflects the times, with its title being chanted in protest over and over by the track’s end. “Offensive Noise” perfectly sums the band’s growing reputation toward “the man,” while “Heroin is Ugly” confronts a dark epidemic plaguing much of the band’s home turf. Featuring a rather rousing guitar solo smack (no pun intended) in the middle of the song, climaxing with “Why have all my fucking friends died!” giving a real glimpse into an issue faced by the loved ones of the disease.

Nervous Aggression concludes This is Ragecore with the sonic blast that is “We All Go.” A track that hints at resistance, and that resistance is hope.

All in all, This is Ragecore leaves you foaming at the mouth, wanting more. Despite it’s shirt runtime, it feels like stepping in the pit and sharing the rage with your brothers and sister. It’s pure adrenaline! And a must have for fans of classic Hardcore Punk like Black Flag, Bad Brains and Circle Jerks. Standout tracks include “No Justice No Peace,” “Heroin is Ugly” and “We All Go.” The EP can be purchased via Nervois Aggression’s official Bandcamp.

Annihilate performing at Freestock 2016. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

                                                    Annihilate performing at Freestock 2016. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

Since its inception over three decades ago, Hardcore music has utilized extremity to take a stand. Through Hardcore, the voice of a misanthropic youth was given a primal yet intellectual platform, to rage against a society gone mad. And through this blast of angst and energy, a message of hope and empowerment is brought to light.

Such is the tradition of this extreme extension of Punk Rock, a tradition proudly carried forward by the likes of Mahoning Valley’s newest powerhouse, Annihilate!

Annihilate began roughly a year ago as its members began searching for something they just weren’t getting from their previous bands. It wasn’t until these individuals came together and begin making noise, that a clear path was to be set.

“This band is more or less the product of two previous bands breaking apart. It started off as The Event Horizon which only Billy (Russell, vocals) was a part of at the time. One day he messaged me on Facebook telling me he liked my drum covers and that he wanted me to be their new drummer and that was about it,” said drummer Andrew Blose of the band’s formation.

Blose also said that it wasn’t until co-founding member Nick Cavicchi jumped to lead guitar that Annihilate really found it’s stride.

“Nick was actually playing bass with us for a while. It wasn’t until Annihilate that he started playing lead in the band. As ATI we were still having problems with writing music as well as other personal problems between members so we made the decision to let go of one of our guitarists, rewrite all of our songs and change the name to Annihilate. This was when we made the decision to start writing more Hardcore-driven songs,” said Blose.

Of the music of Annihilate, Cavicchi said that it was very akin to the classic Hardcore bands of the 80s, like Black Flag and Dead Kennedys for example, for rallied against the establishment and emphasized the ideas of individuality and empowerment.

“The music we write is in my own opinion pretty true to the OG Punk bands as far as the meaning goes. It’s about staying true to yourself and your friends. It’s pretty much like how Dead Kennedys said ‘fuck you’ to the establishment and the weak-minded people around them. What I think it means to be a Hardcore/Punk band these days is about just being yourself,” explained Cavicchi.

Annihilate vocalist Billy Russell. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

Annihilate vocalist Billy Russell. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

He added that the band is more concerned with it’s message of unity and keeping in step with those who seek it, rather than fame or glory, or the multitude of negativity from those who perpetuate such negativity.

“This band was founded around being friends and playing shows to our friends. Personally, I’m not in this for fame or anything like that. I’m in it to make a stand. I’m in it to write against racism and all the bullshit fascist mentalities people have. If people don’t like how we have songs against racists and weak people who bully people, then they can fuck off,” said Cavicchi.

Interestingly enough, 2016 has proven to be a big year for extreme music, particularly Hardcore. Rightfully so, bands such as Nails and Full of Hell have been in the national spotlight being featured in mainstream publications like Rolling Stone and Vice. The members of Annihilate feel that this is an exciting time indeed to see this music begin to flourish.

“I feel like it is a huge time for extreme music. You see more and more fans of heavier styles of music showing up left and right and it’s a great feeling. We’ve kind of been the ‘black sheep’ of the music scene for decades so it’s definitely awesome that metal is becoming more accepted in our culture. The music we know and create is making a huge impression on people,” said vocalist Billy Russell.

However, they are unsure as to whether or not they would fit in with it completely.

“We don’t really know if we fit into the scene or not. We’ve never really thought about it that way,” said Russell.

“Deciding whether or not we fit into a scene is kind of funny when you think about it,” added bassist Graham Kirk. “The whole rise of Punk rock was based on the idea of not fitting in and that idea stayed true when it evolved into Hardcore. But if the entire Hardcore scene is just a bunch of misfits looking for a purpose then you can count us in.”

Cavicchi explained that although this scene is taking off nationally, and regionally, it’s yet to catch on in their hometown of Youngstown, Ohio.

“Our local scene in Youngstown is not so great for Hardcore music and fans. Regionally it’s alright, but Cleveland is where it seems to shine. Most venues here in Youngstown aren’t the biggest fans of the energy hardcore brings but I can see their angle. Cleveland, on the other hand, is pretty good for bands like us to play. Personally I’d like to see more venues open-minded to Hardcore and Punk bands playing even if the shows get wild. Those are the shows people remember for years,” said Cavicchi.

Annihilate guitarist Nick Cavicchi. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

Annihilate guitarist Nick Cavicchi. Photo by Katlyn Jackson Photography.

He also expressed the important of house shows and more DIY situations where the fans can be more directly involved.

“So for me, 2017 should be a year of more bands playing in Youngstown. Hell, even new bands can play house shows and not worry about what people think. Most bands around here are out for personal gain and I want to change that. We should come together and support each other. That too should be a big change made within the next year,” Cavicchi said.

More so than almost any other genre of music, Punk and Hardcore artists have always maintained a direct and somewhat personal relationship with their fans. The members of Annihilate are fully embracive of this practice and utilize social media to its maximum potential.

“Social media is definitely a great tool for gaining more of a following. We have all of these resources like Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, etc. at our disposal to connect with people from all around the world. They didn’t have that opportunity before the Internet crawled into the mainstream, so I’d say we’re pretty lucky to be a band in the generation we’re in as far as publicity is concerned. And I think shows should have a huge impression on the audience,” said Blose.

However, they indicate that a strong live show will leave the longest lasting impression on fans above all else.

“You want to captivate them in that moment and have them leave with something that isn’t tangible,” said Blose. “It takes more than standing in one spot and running through the motions to accomplish that. I’ve seen bands play that have impressed the fuck out of me musically, but they had one or two people watching them because they weren’t doing anything. They weren’t moving around, they weren’t interacting with the crowd; they just looked down at what they were playing the whole time and walked off stage when they were done. You’re only as good as you make yourself look.”

“As far as live shows go, I remember playing with Hatebreed and Acacia Strain when I was in Cherry Poppins and talking to Jamey Jasta of Hatebreed. He gave me advice on how to get fans to show more support and what it means to be a part of this scene and what he told me has stuck to me since. He said, ‘I remember playing in front of a crowd of 10 people. Going, setting up and performing, not knowing what is going to happen next, but it didn’t matter what happened next. All we wanted to do was give a message to people that we didn’t give a fuck what people think. Just go out there and make them want more every single fucking time.’ I remember that clearly because that showed me that the bands I look up to have been in the spot we are in and we have the potential of doing something great,” added Russell.

Annihilate has some big plans moving forward into 2017. As of October 2016, they’ve began work with Billy Duganne at Legion Productions on recording their debut EP, which the band hopes to release by year’s end. In the meantime, you can listen to Annihilate’s debut single, “3:15,” by clicking here.

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

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Artist: Black Flag

Album: What the…

Release Date: 12/3/12

Rating: 1.5/5

For many, Black Flag are what it means to be hardcore. The abrasive and rebellious act pioneered the early 80’s hardcore punk and straight edge scenes. They took punk up about ten notches, incorporating elements of Black Sabbath’s trademark heavy riffing and The Stooges’ primal energy into an aggressive juggernaught.

Later material featured the dark and satirical poetry of frontman Henry Rollins. Their sound started to evolve as well, slowing the tempos and leading into proto-grunge and sludge. Black Flag disbanded by 1986, leaving much of the late 80’s/early 90’s alternative movement to owe a huge debt to the band’s legacy.

In the years since, the members have gone very separate ways. Rollins formed the successful Rollins Band project and went on to write several books and become an international spoken word artist. Guitarist Dez Cadena joined the Misfits in 2002 and has been writing and touring with them since. Earlier this year however, founding guitarist and songwriter Greg Ginn decided to resurrect Black Flag, much to the dismay of his former band mates.

Despite a lawsuit pending over the use of the name “Black Flag,” Ginn decided to hire a new crop of musicians for the project. Joining the picture are Gregory Moore on drums, singer Ron Reyes (who has since been replaced by pro skateboarder Mike Vallely) and bassist Chuck Dukowski for the new album, What the…

The album features much of the bark found on the bulk of the old material, but lacks the bite. Lackluster performances on tracks such as “Shut Up,” “My Heart’s Pumping” and “Get Out of My Way” show a lack of inspiration, or perhaps lack of the original chemistry of Black Flag. Other lukewarm tracks like “Wallow in Despair” attempt to grasp the lyrical angst of their class Damaged LP, but fail to really get off the ground.

The few highlights of the album would include “The Chase” and “No Teeth” proving interesting musically. The grinding hardcore riffs sound closer to vintage Black Flag than anything else on What the…

Overall, What the…‘s title best describes it. The album as whole sparked the questions “why now?” and “why this?” The songs Ginn comprised aren’t exactly terrible, and perhaps under the moniker of a new and separate project, they may have more of an impact. What the… feels like the sad cries of a tarnished legacy.