Nick Cave

All posts tagged Nick Cave

The best 2016 had to offer…

RICK’S PICKS:

Artist of the Year: David Bowie

Album of the Year: David Bowie – Blackstar

Song of the Year: Nails – You Will Never Be One of Us

Music Video of the Year: Anti-Flag – Without End

Rock Act of the Year: Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

Alternative Act of the Year: Radiohead

Rap/Hip-Hop Act of the Year: Danny Brown

Punk Act of the Year: Descendants

Metal Act of the Year: Nails

Best Collaboration: The Body/Full of Hell

Best Live Act: Swans

Best Local/Regional Live Act: Mississippi Gun Club

Best Album: (Local/Regional Act): Mississippi Gun Club – Shovelhead

Comeback of the Year: Metallica

Best New Artist: S U R V I V E

Lifetime Achievement: David Bowie

 

SARAH’S PICKS:

By Sarah Sepanek

TOP 10 SHOWS OF 2016 (no order but yeah Boris/SunnO)))/Sleep wins)

Cobalt/Mantar @ Mohawk: This show was just volcanic. Everyone looked like melting plastic. It was like we were in musical lava. Charlie Fell was just in glorious agony, sealed himself as frontman.

Dragged Into Sunlight/Primitive Man/Make @ Paper Tiger, SA: Possibly the hottest show ever, in some loading dock windowless garage. Very cerebral. Make and Primitive Man both gave good doomface; Dragged, however, faced the wall so if they were making metal faces, I didn’t see. Some jags pulled down the giant candelabra in front of the stage and nailed me in the chest so hard I wondered if I cracked a rib. But I stayed in that dark hot hell room till the end. They easily outdrew Big Business in the room next door.

Reverend Horton Heat w. Jello Biafra @ Continental Club: I’ve loved the Rev for going on 20 years; still a solid showman. Still damn charming too. Sometimes it’s just fun to dance and goof around. Jello Biafra had his crotch three inches from my face for half an hour and stage dived on me several times, but it was neat seeing them do Dead Kennedys songs together. Also I duked it out with some drunk girl up front and won. Any excuse to spray up my hair is a good night.

Gatecreeper/Oathbreaker/Skeletonwitch @ Barracuda: Definitely a show where the openers outshone the main act. Gatekeeper and Oathbreaker had both just released amazing records, and they didn’t disappoint live.

Crawl/BLK OPS/The Body/Full of Hell @ Sidewinder: Broken strings aside, this was a sonic strobe flash of otherworldly noise. Only caveat was that since they were playing just their one album together, it was kind of short.

Annihilation Time/Fuck You Pay Me @ Barracuda: Confetti, Jimmy Rose, Ohio, Erba – a farewell of Cleveland proportions came to Texas for two nights and Night Two was wild as fuck. Austin for all its weird-bragging is lacking in pure crazy at punk/hardcore shows. Tony Erba bashing his face into a pole was met with more concern than enthusiasm, but there was confetti and toilet paper and it was amazing for the “last” AT show.

Grim Reaper @ Dirty Dog: I didn’t expect this to be as much fun as it was. I usually balk at nostalgia tours because I mostly feel guilty at bands having to slough through Spinal Tap-esque sets past their prime, but Grim Reaper was a shitload of fun. Steve Grimmett was still in excellent voice, and he poked fun at himself, made dirty jokes between songs, and had fun posing with fans holding a giant sword. He even used a goddamn selfie stick. Thumbs up from me.

Torche @ Barracuda: The first of 2 times seeing Steve Brooks and the boys this year, and the first time I had seen one of his bands in at least 10 years. Definitely reminded of why he’s one of my favorite people on the planet, as he rolled on the floor wailing solos Marty McFly-style.

Insane Clown Posse @ Empire Control Room: Shows in ATX are a lot less … unhinged than I’m used to, so this messy trash circus was a pleasant reprieve. ICP played all of Riddle Box, which I had on orange cassette. Jugglo fam was friendly and festive. Not used to that level of camaraderie here either. Everyone was happy. And wet. I sprayed gallons of diet root beer Faygo, sang all the words. It was Shaggy 2 Dope’s birthday. I’ve been to the Gathering when it was at the Ledges so I knew to warn an ICP virgin not to wear his good shoes. Walked to the car soaked, down with the clown.

Sleep/SunnO)))/Boris @ Mohawk: This show happened by accident, due to a festival rainout, and I got tickets by the grace of god. Hundreds of angry fest pass-holders were left SOL as they reorganized the fest acts into new smaller venues and did a whole new ticket sale. The stage itself was gear porn, loaded with amps and gongs and drums and stacks and backlined within an inch of its life. I got fog machine cancer and couldn’t hear for a week but it was so good. So good. Surreally good. Once in a lifetime.

HONORABLE MENTIONS
X_X/Obnox @ Barracuda
Fister/Aseethe/Clrvoyant @ The Lost Well
Sleep brunch @ Mohawk
Vermin Womb/Pornohelmut @ The Lost Well
Destroyer 666 @ Satellite Bar, Houston
ITCHY-O @ Scoot Inn
Goatwhore @ Grizzly Hall
High On Fire @ Grizzly Hall
Daikaiju @ The Grand
Wreck & Reference @ Sidewinder
Karma to Burn/The Obsessed @ Dirty Dog
Antwon/Fat Tony/Xetas @ Barracuda
SURVIVE record release @ Barracuda
Absu/Expander @ Sidewinder
Bongzilla/Lo-Pan/Author & Punisher/Black Cobra @ Swan Dive & The Lost Well
The Body @ The Lost Well

Most ridiculous/embarrassing: Tie between Taake and Millions of Dead Cops
Biggest letdown: St. Vitus @ Grizzly Hall
Best onstage coat wearing: Tie between Absu (Proscriptor!) and Taake (leather jacket w sleeves pushed up w no shirt)
Best show that never happened: Levitation Fest – Runner up: l.o.t.i.o.n @ Electric Church (waited til 5 am only to have amps blow out or something; in retrospect that place was a death trap)

By Rick Polo (Editor-in-Chief)

It has been over two decades since the world last heard from Cleveland alternative rock pioneers, Death of Samanatha. The band became one of the key players of the 80’s college rock movement, craving out a unique niche in the scene. But by the later part of the decade, at what seemed as the height of the group’s success, they disbanded and have remained relatively quiet for more than 20 years. Now they’re poised for a comeback with a long-awaited reunion disc spanning their short-lived but highly influential career.

Formed in 1983 by singer and guitarist John Petkovic, guitarist Doug Gillard, bassist David James and drummer Steven Eierdam, Death of Samantha took the scene by storm, becoming one of the first notable alternative/indie rock frontrunners in Cleveland. The infamous first gig at a Ground Round family restaurant has become that of legend. With bizarre stage antics, puck rock ethos and sound primed and ready for college radio, the band quickly rose to recognition, and caught the eye of Homestead Records in 1986.

At the time, Homestead Records, based out of New York, was home to some the biggest names underground rock had to offer at the time, including Sonic Youth, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and Dinosaur Jr. The full length debut for the label, Strungout on Jargon, brought the band on the national underground scene. They continued to tour the latter half of the 80’s alongside big names such as The Replacements, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Sonic Youth, Nirvana and the Smashing Pumpkins.

Death of Samantha supporting Sonic Youth in the mid-80's.

Death of Samantha supporting Sonic Youth in the mid-80’s.

Sadly, as their aforementioned touring partners caught major label deals and broke out onto the early 90’s MTV scene, they never stuck it out long enough to ee their break. Following the release of Where the Women Wear the Glory and the Men Wear the Pants in 1988 and Come All Ye Faithless in 1990, Death of Samantha called it quits. A small reunion was attempted in 92, but never got off the ground. The band, whose influence can still likely be heard on rock radio via post-grunge/post-alternative acts (think Bush, Everclear, and perhaps Green Day).

In recent years, the original lineup of Death of Samantha have remained active musically, playing a handful off one-off reunions such as at the Beachwood Ballroom in Cleveland and 4th and 4th Fest in Columbus, Ohio. As of late last year, the have recorded an 18-track double album titled If Memory Serves to be released on Feb. 11 via the band’s St. Valentine Records. It will be their first release in 24 years.

If Memory Serves is comprised of re-recordings of old material. In an interview with the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Petkovek said that the two-disc retrospective has gotten the band’s creative juices flowing, as they are planning more endeavors for the coming months.

“…a lead-in to a tour and a record of all-new material in 2015,” said Petkovek.

With a wealth of 80s indie rock acts such as My Bloody Valentine, The Replacements and the Pixies reuniting and releasing new music, there is no doubt that the time is right for Death of Samanatha to return to the scene and pick up where they have left off. Perhaps nostalgia for some, and a new chapter, new era or even a new beginning for many others.

Ian Curtis of Joy Division.

Ian Curtis of Joy Division.

By Jennifer Elizabeth Rose (Social/Cultural Writer and Music/Arts Historian)

The often misunderstood (or mystified) Goth genre has roots in the darker and/or unexplored Glam Rock and of the course early modern European historical definition. While many rock journalists have cited Jim Morrison the first Gothic Rock singer with his low, intriguing baritone vocals and previously unexplored lyrical themes which were often disturbing both psychologically and artistically in the 60’s, The Velvet Underground achieved the complete backdrop instrumentally and via arrangement including stylistic contributions.

Lou Reed, singer/songwriter, along with Sterling Morrison, the explorative guitarist and velvet-voiced songstress, Nico probably had more in common with darker art rock of their day but this is in fact why they were astounding as an ensemble to the genre’s infancy.

Into the 70’s, Nick Cave and The Birthday Party continued to travel the uncharted territories with his own brand of improv and perceived madness. And while Ian Curtis of Joy Division did much of the same, he examined personal and rugged emotion, no matter the sort. The depressed Goth myth can begin here unfortunately.

Obvious Jim Morrison influences in lower vocal register were apparent, staggered lyric-focused melodies (like Reed’s) were also highlighted. But instrumentally, The Birthday Party and Joy Division embodied not only the “sound” but also arrangement which as again revamped but with a focus on bottom register as a whole (i.e. bass guitar and other instruments which include a lasher/velvety bottom end or even guitars with deeper timbre). These elements were explored and solidified. The style and name of the genre was being defined.

In September of 1979, Tony Wilson, journalist and host of the British show, So It Goes, used the term Gothic to define Joy Division’s stark and eerie style.

“Dancing music with Gothic overtones.” he explained.

By the time contemporaries such as the longstanding Sisters of Mercy which spanned, and spawned many other subgenres such as Goth-Industrial and Goth Metal. Eventually, contemporaries such as Souxsie and the Banshees and The Cure added their elements and developed their more otherworldly, ethereal take on the genre lyrically and instrumentally. Often sporting an odd mash up of the darker corners of the Glam Rock movement and a sort of Post-Punk irony, the aforementioned acts delivered and stamped Goth Rock into the psyches of any sub or sub sub-genre.

While some sub-genres are often thought of when many people nowadays think of “Goth,” there is no substitute for the root and its purposes; examining universal dark themes (not evil, but dark).

Dark is defined in the Free Dictionary as “Lacking or having very little light: a dark corner. b. Lacking brightness: a dark day. 2. Reflecting only a small fraction of incident light.” Such is the very definition of Goth in ANY medium dating back to Medieval and Renaissance visual art and architecture.

While acts such as Bauhaus are often praised and many worthy modern Goth acts (especially Industrial acts) such as ThouShaltNot are overlooked, modern dark ambient and ethereal examples especially from the Projekt Records label are strongest overall “GOTHS.” Acts such as Black Tape for a Blue Girl, This Ascension and Unto Ashes, as well as the solo projects from Mortiis from the Black Metal band, Emperor, own this era of the genre and have kept it strong and genuine since the 90’s via label owner and musician, Sam Rosenthal.

In addition to my “Picks of the Week” which spanned a proto- Goth to 80’s Goth timeline, I also offer for your consideration the aforementioned classic acts and the following modern often overlooked examples of the best of the genre. Enjoy! And do try and pick up or legally download these independent artists’ records.

Black Tape for a Blue Girl – Across a Thousand Blades

This Ascension – Mysterium

ThouShaltNot – Without Faith